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  1. by on - Book review

    Book review of The Fate of Anatomical Collections, by Rina Knoeff & Robert Zwijnenberg

  2. by on - Discussion

    The author outlines the development and intellectual underpinnings of the Dibner Award-winning exhibition Split + Splice: Fragments from the Age of Biomedicine (Medical Museion, 2009). Deep connections between biotechnologies, technologies of the self, and the technology that is an exhibition are examined.

  3. by , on - Obituary

    Obituary of Brian Bracegirdle

  4. by on - Object focus

    An essay on the making of England and her Soldiers, a book written by Harriet Martineau and based on the statistical work of Florence Nightingale.

  5. by on - Object focus

    In 1946 the Giustiniani Medicine Chest came into the Science Museum Collection having originally been bought in Italy in 1924 by an agent of Sir Henry Wellcome, for his medical collection. This article assesses its provenance and history.

  6. by , , , on - Object focus

    This paper reconstructs the history and reception of the Dr Nelson’s Inhaler as a means of understanding the growth of inhalation therapy in the mid-nineteenth century.

  7. by , on - Research

    The paper deals with new surgical paradigm elaborated by French surgeon Ambroise Paré, who proposed a version of wound care where the cauterising was replaced with ligature of vessels and healing balm dressing.

  8. by on - Research

    This article examines the surgical treatment and prevention of facial wounds and scars in early modern Britain through a close study of the unpublished casebook of St Bartholomew’s Hospital surgeon Joseph Binns.

  9. by on - Research

    Close inspection of William Bally’s miniature phrenological specimens – a set of 60 small plaster busts – has led to a reappraisal of their origin and use. Made in 1832, they helped position Bally as ‘one of the best practical phrenologists in England’.

  10. by on - Research

    In 1576 a plague epidemic inflicted physical and psychological wounds on the community of Mantua. This article examines the role of processions in healing those wounds and discusses the programme of processions organised by the city’s health office in conjunction with religious groups including Mantua’s confraternities.

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