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  1. by on - Discussion

    This article discusses the concept of ‘heroism’ in relation to science, medicine and technology. It unpicks the complexities of the concept and discusses its implications for historians of science and museum professionals.

  2. by on - Research

    For the instrument makers of the early-nineteenth century there was no distinction between scientific and popular instruments. Exploring the case of the optician Phillip Carpenter, this article will address three popular media formats — the 1817 Kaleidoscope, 1821 Phantasmagoria Lantern and 1827 Microcosm.

  3. by on - Book review

    Book review: Physics and Psychics: The Occult and the Sciences in Modern Britain, by Richard Noakes

  4. by on - Research

    This article addresses how and why the Royal Society of Medicine (RSM), as a hub of research and education and with its multidisciplinary membership, became active in lantern projection, circulation and popularisation as a scientific teaching practice in First World War Britain.

  5. by on - Research

    In 1761–62, King George III commissioned a group of philosophical instruments from the London instrument-maker George Adams. This article traces Adams’s techniques of borrowing and adapting printed instrument designs, as he produced this spectacular collection.

  6. by on - Research

    This article reappraises the role of a now almost-forgotten exhibition of 1876 in building a vision for the permanent Science Museum, which was established nine years later. It argues that the exhibition promoted two apparently contrasting narratives about science used by founders, funders and lobbyists and circulating in the wider public sphere.

  7. by on - Review

    A review of the Ships, clocks and stars: the quest for longitude exhibition at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London.

  8. by on - Book review

    Nasim investigates the process, back in the pre-1880 era before the introduction of the sensitive photographic plate, that converts what an observer sees through a telescope eyepiece, to the drawing the observer makes on a piece of paper, and then to the engraving or lithograph that is finally published.

  9. by on - Book review

    A critical review of the publication Perfect Mechanics: Instrument Makers at the Royal Society of London in the Eighteenth Century, by Richard Sorrenson

  10. by on - Review

    Review of the exhibition Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee at the Royal College of Physicians

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